SCOTTSBORO STORIES, BLOG & NAVIGATION GUIDE

>>PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR DATED STORY POSTINGS<<

>>LINKS ABOUT THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS MUSEUM LISTED BELOW<<

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The "Scottsboro Stories" blog reflects the writings, photographs, arrangements, opinions and musings of me, Garry L. Morgan, only. I do not represent the Scottsboro Boys Museum or the Scottsboro Multicultural Foundation - the parent organization of the Scottsboro Boys Museum. I receive no profit from this endeavor. This blog is for educational purposes and that of open expression about racial and sexual discrimination, institutional and personal racism and the deadliest war of all time - "The Culture War."


SCOTTSBORO BOYS MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER OPENING STORIES

The Ledger: "Scottsboro, Ala., Museum Opens to Mark a Shameful Case " http://www.theledger.com/article/20100221/NEWS/2215011


Monday, August 12, 2013

Women's Equality Day - August 26, 2013

2013 Department of Defense poster,
courtesy of the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI)
               
"August 26th is the anniversary of national woman suffrage.  Across the seventy-two years between the first major women’s rights conference at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848, and the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, thousands of people participated in marches through cities like New York and Washington DC, wrote editorials and pamphlets, gave speeches all over the nation, lobbied political organizations, and held demonstrations with the goal of achieving voting rights for women.  Women also picketed the White House with questions like, “Mr. President, what are you going to do about woman’s suffrage?” “Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?”  This was the first time in history that a group of people picketed the White House." http://www.nwhm.org/blog/celebrate-equality-day/ 
 
Each time a girl opens a book and reads a womanless history,
she learns she is worth less.

– Myra Pollack Sadker

History helps us learn who we are, but when we don’t know our own history, our power and dreams are immediately diminished.

Multicultural American women are overlooked in most mainstream approaches to U.S. history, so the National Women’s History Project champions their accomplishments and leads the drive to write women back into history. http://www.nwhp.org/aboutnwhp/index.php


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