SCOTTSBORO STORIES, BLOG & NAVIGATION GUIDE

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The "Scottsboro Stories" blog reflects the writings, photographs, arrangements, opinions and musings of me, Garry L. Morgan, only. I do not represent the Scottsboro Boys Museum or the Scottsboro Multicultural Foundation - the parent organization of the Scottsboro Boys Museum. I receive no profit from this endeavor. This blog is for educational purposes and that of open expression about racial and sexual discrimination, institutional and personal racism and the deadliest war of all time - "The Culture War."


SCOTTSBORO BOYS MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER OPENING STORIES

The Ledger: "Scottsboro, Ala., Museum Opens to Mark a Shameful Case " http://www.theledger.com/article/20100221/NEWS/2215011


Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Scottsboro Boys Museum and Cultural Center Celebrates Black History Month and 1 Year of Operation

DOD-DEOMI Special Observance Art for Black History Month.

The National Theme for Black History month this year is African Americans and the Civil War.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH
February, Black History Month at the Scottsboro Boys Museum & Cultural Center, ‏ 428 W. Willow St., Historic Joyce Chapel, Scottsboro, Alabama.

Saturday, Feb. 5 - Open 10AM-4PM. Special video presentations at 11AM and 2PM on the Scottsboro Boys Case

Saturday, Feb. 12 - Open 10AM-4PM. Special video presentation at 11AM Scottsboro Boys Case; 2PM presentation on African Americans in the Civil War by Garry L. Morgan, U.S. Army Retired, Historian Scottsboro Boys Museum.

Saturday, Feb. 19 - Open 10AM-4PM. Special video presentation at 11AM on the Scottsboro Boys Case. Special presentation by Ms. Sheryl Snodgrass-Caffey at 3PM "THE IMPACT OF THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS' CASES ON CIVIL RIGHTS - - YESTERDAY & TODAY" & "A Bit of Local Civil Rights History"

Saturday, Feb. 26 - Open 10AM-4PM. Special video presentations at 11AM and 2PM on the Scottsboro Boys Case



Black History month program, click for an expanded view of the program.
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Scottsboro's Daily Sentinel Link to the story. Video's attached to the D.S. story. http://thedailysentinel.com/news/article_f9b8b444-2e53-11e0-95f6-001cc4c03286.html
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Ms. Sheila Washington, Founder and Director of the Scottsboro Boys Museum and Cultural Center

The Scottsboro Boys under guard at Scottsboro, Alabama March 26, 1931.

Tuesday, February the 1st the Scottsboro Boys Museum and Cultural Center in Scottsboro, Alabama began our celebration of Black History Month and 1 year of operation.
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Ms. Marilyn Jones Stamps was our featured speaker. Ms Stamps says, "I have a love for history." Ms. Stamps works with the Department of Tourism in Montgomery. She delivered a moving presentation.
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"We do not have to live in the past...Our heritage is defined by our forfathers." Ms. Stamps related how her father influenced her life. She told of the sacrifices her father made, Prince Albert Jones. One of her fathers quotes was "I'd rather go to jail for something I did not do rather than something I had done."
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Ms. Stamps told the story of how local law enforcement in her home town attempted to keep her father and other black citizens from registering to vote. Another one of her fathers quotes, "Do your best, be diligent, work hard, carry yourself with pride and hold your head up."
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Ms. Stamps closed with Langston Hughes' poem "Freedoms Plow." A remarkable, revealing poem, about sacrifices, struggles and the rights of African Americans. Langston Hughes lived in Jim Crow America, born in 1907, died in 1967. His ashes are interned at the Shomberg Library Center in New York, New York.
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A small part of "Freedoms Plow:"
"...Some were slave hands
Guarding in their hearts the seed of freedom,
But the word was there always:
Freedom."
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"Down into the earth went the plow
In the free hands and the slave hands,
In indentured hands and adventurous hands,
Turning the rich soil went the plow in many hands
That planted and harvested the food that fed
And the cotton that clothed America..."
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A long time ago,
An enslaved people heading toward freedom
Made up a song: Keep Your Hand On The Plow! Hold On!
The plow plowed a new furrowAcross the field of history.
Into that furrow the freedom seed was dropped.
From that seed a tree grew, is growing, will ever grow.
That tree is for everybody,
For all America, for all the world.
May its branches spread and shelter grow
Until all races and all peoples know its shade.
KEEP YOUR HAND ON THE PLOW! HOLD ON!
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Langston Hughes' complete poem may be found at "Old Poetry." http://oldpoetry.com/opoem/12628-Langston-Hughes-Freedom-s-Plow
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A special presentation from our celebration event on Tuesday February 1, 2011 at the Scottsboro Boys Museum & Cultural Center which was attended by 85 persons.


 


WAAY TV video

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Garry, GREAT JOB!!! THANKS FOR ALL YOU DO TO MAKE THINGS COME ALIVE THRU YOUR SKILLS FOR THE SCOTTSBORO BOYS MUSEUM...XOXO
SHELIA

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