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The "Scottsboro Stories" blog reflects the writings, photographs, arrangements, opinions and musings of me, Garry L. Morgan, only. I do not represent the Scottsboro Boys Museum or the Scottsboro Multicultural Foundation - the parent organization of the Scottsboro Boys Museum. I receive no profit from this endeavor. This blog is for educational purposes and that of open expression about racial and sexual discrimination, institutional and personal racism and the deadliest war of all time - "The Culture War."


SCOTTSBORO BOYS MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER OPENING STORIES

The Ledger: "Scottsboro, Ala., Museum Opens to Mark a Shameful Case " http://www.theledger.com/article/20100221/NEWS/2215011


Monday, March 1, 2010

Rev. R.L. Shanklin, "The End of Black History Month, Where Do We Go From Here? The True History Of Being Black in America Must Be Told."

Keynote Speaker at the Scottsboro Boys Museum and Cultural Center, Black History Program, February 28, 2010, Reverend R.L. Shanklyn, former President of the Alabama NAACP, Minister Progressive Union Missionary Baptist Church, Huntsville, Al.. Reverend Shanklins message: "Where do we go from here?"
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Reverend Shanklin began his presentation with a quote from Frederick Douglas, "Where there is no struggle there is no progress." Reverend Shanklin gave a moving presentation about his life experiences and how they relate to Black History. His presentation was a commentary on struggle, perseverance, faith, ministry, accomplishment and his experiance of being a Black Man in America.
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Reverend Shanklin commented how Joyce Chapel took him back to an earlier day in his life. He told us about how a white man had kicked him for drinking water from a jug while working in a tobacco field to quench his thirst and how that incident affected his early life. His thoughts were, "there must be a better way and a better day. Black history is part of the American Experience but it is not presented truthfully." He talked about the importance of Black History and why the Scottsboro Boys Museum is so very important in telling the story about being Black in America.
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Stories of the struggles and accomplishments of Martin Luther King, Jesse Jackson and Archie Stewart. Rev. Shanklin told us of his experiences with Archie Stewart and his respect for Mr. Stewart's actions in the local NAACP Chapter.
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"Standing on the shoulders of our forefathers, walking in the blood of our forefathers, we will be counted. Peace, Harmony, Love and Respect, is the road we must follow, God will take care of the rest." This was Reverend Shanklin's parting message.
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Thank you Reverend Shanklin for your moving presentation.

Reverend Gary Speers presented Reverend Shanklin with a copy of Dan Carter's book, "Scottsboro." A parting gift of appreciation for his presentation. Reverend Speers also presented Reverend Shanklin with a Scottsboro City Pin, "Scottsboro, Someplace Special."

Reverend Shanklin and wife.


Ms. Shanklin makes a presentation to Ms. Sheila Washington, Museum Chairperson and Foundation President for her work on the Courthouse Plaque Commemorating the Scottsboro Boys and the Scottsboro Boys Museum.



Mr. J.D. Stevens sung 2 songs for our closing ceremonies for Black History Month. Mr. Stevens also related to me about his early 1960's church experiences in Jackson County.


Ms. Candice Lovelady graces the Chapel with her beautiful voice.

28 people were in attendance for Reverend Shanklin's presentation.

Mr. Charles Elliot, Scottsboro Jackson County Multicultural Heritage Foundation Board of Directors and Scottsboro Boys Museum Executive Committee gave the Invocation.
 

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